Monthly Archives: July 2013

Asymmetric Rendition: Why Robert Lady’s Plane Won’t be Grounded

CIA Seal on FloorRobert Seldon Lady, a convicted kidnapper who also happens to be a CIA spook, got on an airplane yesterday bound for the United States. He was convicted (along with 22 other CIA agents) of kidnapping in Italy in 2009, and was to receive a nine-year prison sentence for the kidnapping of Hassan Mustafa Osama Nasr aka Abu Omar, in what the Italians are calling the Imam Rapito (Kidnapped Imam) affair. Nasr was whisked away to Egypt, where he was submitted to torture.

Robert Lady, a genuine fugitive from the law, gets to board an airplane back to the United States after the US government put pressure on the Panamanian govenment, who arrested him 2 days ago. Italy filed a request for the extradition of Lady, but he is safely sipping his coffee in the US now I suspect.

I wondered whether Lady’s plane would be denied access to the airspace of Central American countries, but I am afraid I already know the answer. Unlike the democratically-elected President of Bolivia Evo Morales, whose airplane was grounded for 14 hours in Vienna when flying home from a summit in Moscow on the mere suspicion that Edward Snowden might be on board (due to pressure put on European countries by the United States), a convicted felon like Lady gets a free ride back to his homeland.

Richard_ODwyerThe problem with these extradition agreements is that they are always horribly lopsided in favour of the United States. The influence the Americans have on world politics is still enormous, and it isn’t for the better. They go about extraordinary rendering and torturing and murdering countless of hapless people, people who generally just go about their daily lives and attend wedding parties and whatnot.

So on the one hand, the United States is demanding that other countries extradite their citizens whenever the US requests it of them, like in the case of Richard O’Dwyer, who did nothing more harmful than building a website on which you could share links to video/audio content, but on the other hand, a convicted felon, responsible for the horrific, inhumane torture of Abu Omar gets to enjoy freedom from persecution in the US.

US intervention in South America and the War on Drugs

The United States still considers Latin America to be their backyard. The Latin American countries however, had to suffer many decades of US intervention, with one democratically elected leader being assassinated by the CIA after another, with one CIA-sponsored coup after another, the US has done little to secure peace in Latin America. And this isn’t just happening in Latin America, the US is doing this all over the world. They euphemistically call it “regime change.” And nowadays, with the War on Drugs in full swing, the US creates a market where South American drug cartels are more than happy to supply. After all, if there is a market somewhere, someone will step in and reap the financial benefits. This is a basic economic law.

Unfortunately, this leads to a lot of crime in these countries. The solution to this is obvious to anyone who has studied this problem in more detail: simply legalize drugs. By legalizing drugs, you can safeguard the quality of the merchandise so people using it won’t get life-threatening crap in their systems, and you immediately shut down the market for the cartels, who now have no way of competing, if the government or companies can legally supply people with guaranteed safe, relatively cheap drugs. This doesn’t only solve the crime problem we have with the cartels nowadays, but it also is of benefit to health care.

Where do we go onwards from here?

The thing is, the US government, by going through with all of their covert regime change projects, their murdering, torturing, droning, extraordinary rendering, etc, is actually damaging the credibility MQ1 Predator Droneof the United States. On the one hand we have Obama who just recently criticized the Russian President Putin on human rights, but look what we have here: Obama, a president who has the dubious distinction of being the only Nobel Peace Prize laureate who has countless of murders on his name. Every week he personally approves the so-called ‘kill list‘. Talking about out-of-control power structures! How can he sleep at night?

The only way forward is for governments to start respecting human and civil rights, and stick to that. We the people need the tools to keep government accountable, it’s the only way to stop history from repeating.

Ubiquitous Tracking by Big Mega Corporations and What We Can Do About It

Nowadays, if you surf the web like any normal person, chances are your movements on the internet will be tracked. There are a lot of companies tracking you and building detailed profiles about your behaviour on the internet. With all the news about the revelations of Edward Snowden about the mass surveillance going on by the NSA, GCHQ and other Three-letter agencies, you might almost forget that there is a whole world out there with various corporate entities who also build profiles about you, either with or without your knowledge and consent.

Why big corporations are tracking you and building profiles about you

Profiles about your Internet behaviour most often get built by simply surfing unprotected, with your browser executing any and all JavaScript that it comes across, which usually does some data collection about your browser and operating system, which then gets sent back to third-party advertising networks who make money building profiles about every user on the internet. Now, of course they claim this is done to better target ads, so you get ads aimed specifically at your current interests and your geographical location or linguistic background, for instance. You see, when you search for something on the internet, you are revealing something very private indeed: you are revealing what you think at that very moment. What things you are likely interested in.

Google Anatylics Dashboard, giving an impression of things it can track.

Google Anatylics Dashboard, giving an impression of things it can track.

This information is worth a lot of money to marketers, who are always on the lookout for ways to target and market their products to just the right audiences. Knowing exactly what people are up to and what their interests are is something marketing departments the world over crave. For if you know exactly what your audience’s interests are, you can tailor the marketing of your products to exactly fit their needs, leading to more sales. Selling access to this information is Google’s main profit model. The major problem with this data collection is that it is all happening without our knowledge or consent. There are only a few large companies in the world who hold a virtual monopoly on acquiring a lot of data about people via the internet. An example would be Facebook; a lot of sites on the internet (tens of millions) have a certain link with Facebook, via their share buttons. Because these buttons are so ubiquitous, found on almost every other site, this causes Facebook to know quite a bit about your surfing behaviour, even if you’re not a Facebook user. Your data still gets collected and stored in a shadow profile, where it is then of course susceptible to acquisition by government agents as well.Filter Bubble

Major problems with personalized results

As more and more people discover their content and news through personalized feeds like those found on Twitter and Facebook etcetera, the stuff that matters gets pushed off the feed. People who live in the filter bubble, a term coined by Eli Pariser, can easily miss vital information about certain major events. I’ll give an example. During the Egyptian Revolution of 2011, two people may be getting two completely different results on Google. One, who is more interested in holidays, according to the profile built up by Google, may be getting more links in the search engine results page (SERP) about holidays to Egypt, and miss news about the revolution completely, whereas someone who is more politically active, may only get links to news sites with articles about the revolution. This is already a major difference in the results you get. You may be under the impression that the results generated by Google are the same for everyone where, evidently, they are not. They are generated based on your personal interests, information you and/or your computer shared with Google. The question is: is it really always a good thing that we only get to see stuff we are interested in? And that some big mega-corporation like Google is deciding that for us? This way we may miss vital information, as the information that reaches us gets censored transparently, without our knowledge or consent. If we only get our news from personalized news feeds like those provided by Facebook, Google and Twitter, we may miss out on a lot of information. Therefore it is prudent to always use as many different sources of information as possible, so efforts to filter our results and trap us in the filter bubble have as little effect on us as possible.

Steps we can take to arm ourselves

There are various things we can do to arm ourselves against tracking by and building up of profiles. First step is using a common browser. This may sound strange, but let me explain. There’s this tool written by the Electronic Software Foundation called the Panopticlick. With this tool you can check all kinds of information about what kind of fingerprint your browser leaves behind, and with how many computers it shares that fingerprint. By having a very large pool of potential computers, all with the same browser fingerprint, we make it harder for companies to track our movements on the internet, as the pool of possible targets will be larger. Browser fingerprinting Cookie Monsterworks without cookies, so it’s a big threat to your online privacy. In terms of browsers, Firefox is a good one. Chrome not so much, as it’s sharing information about which sites you surf with Google. I also recommend Firefox not only because it’s open source, but also because of the vast repository of add-ons available for it. Make sure you disable the setting of third-party cookies. Secondly, it helps if we install browser add-ons like Ghostery, NoScript and AdBlock Plus. These add-ons will specifically disable any Javascript tracking going on, either by completely disabling JavaScript completely (in the case of NoScript), or by having a list of common advertising companies and other various trackers, which it specifically blocks (in the case of Ghostery). AdBlock Plus removes all ads from the websites you visit. They don’t even get loaded. JavaScript is a programming language, with which we can do a lot of cool stuff and make web pages seem more responsive, have our webapps feel more like desktop apps, etc. A lot of stuff is possible with JavaScript. This is in part because it most often gets executed on the client, not on the server. Every browser capable of running JavaScript basically has a virtual machine like Google’s V8, or something similar with which it can run JavaScript. The problem is that with JavaScript the script writer can also get a lot of information back from the browser, and all kinds of nifty hacks are possible if JavaScript is enabled. So disabling JavaScript wherever possible is a very safe thing to do. And with NoScript, you can still enable JavaScript on a per-domain basis as well, if you need it. This will already prevent a large part of the tracking stuff from ever loading on your computer. Other add-ons like RefControl (which will forge or block the HTTP_REFERER header from your browser) also work to enhance your privacy. By reading the HTTP_REFERER header, a site can normally see from what site you came from, and by blocking or forging this header, we don’t reveal any information about our surfing behaviour in this way. HTTPS Everywhere is a good addon to have as well, as it enforces HTTPS (secure, encrypted) communications on sites that support it. Some sites, like Facebook for instance, do support HTTPS communications, but redirect all their links to the insecure HTTP variant. By installing HTTPS Everywhere, which is written by the EFF, we force sites like these to use HTTPS all the time. To check with what sites your browser has shared information about you, you can install Collusion. With this add-on, you can open up a tab with information about which sites you have visited during your browsing session, and with which sites your browser has shared information. This is often substantially more than the sites you actually visit. Many sites for instance use advertising networks, which load their ads from another domain, and data about you gets sent to these networks to track and profile you. To see whether and to what extent this is happening to you, you can install Collusion. To get better protection against tracking, we can change our surfing behaviour by avoiding certain US companies like Google for instance. You can instead search the internet using Startpage. Startpage uses the Google engine, but strips all identifying information from the request before it sends it off to the Google servers, allowing you to search tracking-free. They also don’t store any logs whatsoever, and they use encryption by default.

Right, am I done yet?

The tips above are only good advice in general, and will protect against most profiling attempts by advertising and other profit-oriented companies which try and sell your profile to their clients, but won’t protect you against a determined, well-financed adversary like an intelligence agency. For this, you need to encrypt the hell out of your life, and use crypto like AES, etc. (VeraCrypt) and PGP (GnuPG) as much as possible. Why should we be making it easy for the spooks? In that case, you might also read up on VPNs, and check out the Tor network (but keep in mind that many exit nodes are run by intelligence agencies, so always use end-to-end encryption (e.g. HTTPS) when using Tor). In this case, also try to avoid using any service made available by any US company whatsoever. Think SAAS providers, cloud services, etc. Because of the Patriot Act, US government agencies (and of course, through them, other, foreign intelligence agencies which cooperate with the Americans) can easily request any and all information some company with US ties stores about you. So try to avoid that as much as possible in this case. This is the reason why I’ve moved my online persona to Switzerland, and also running my mail on a mail server that I control. Also think about the security of your devices, and only run free software, so there’s less chance of a back-door hidden in the software you use. But you can read up more on the measures you can take when you’re up against a more powerful adversary. But with the above tips, you’ll be well on your way to better securing your communications. Notice: The above article also got published on UKcolumn.org. While I am very happy with the syndication, I don’t agree with everything published on UKcolumn.org.

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Snowden

Note: This article is also available in Portuguese, translated by Anders Bateva.

US Declaration of Independence237 years ago, 56 traitors to their King and country signed a document which outlined a new philosophy, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable Rights. That among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. This gave birth to a new nation, the United States of America. Funny how your perception can change depending on your viewpoint and background, isn’t it? In 1776, these 56 signatories of the United States Declaration of Independence did something very brave indeed. They took a stand against the Empire on which the sun never sets, the British Empire, because it failed to embody and represent what they believed in: that it should be the task of the government to secure the above rights, and that governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed. And that whenever the government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it. These men are considered patriots by many Americans, because in defying the King of Great Britain in 1776, they founded the United States of America, a nation once conceived on these noble principles. A nation that sadly no longer adheres to the philosophy laid down it its Declaration of Independence. Had history played out differently, these men could have been tried for high treason and hung, drawn and quartered. These men took a huge personal risk based on what they personally believed in. You have to remember, back in 1776, the British Empire was a superpower, quite similar to the roles the United States, Russia and China play today. But history is written by the victors, as they say.

SnowdenEdward Snowden

Now, Snowden blew the whistle because he recognized the government failed to defend the rights of the people, failed to embody the spirit in which it was founded 237 years ago. This is an incredibly brave thing to do. Just think about it: he had to leave his friends and family and his entire life behind and can probably never visit his friends and family again, because he did what he felt was right: expose the crimes committed by the US government. By many he is now branded a traitor, similar to how those 56 signatories were viewed by a portion of the British people back in the day. I sincerely hope Snowden will stay safe. One of the things that struck me when following the Snowden story, is that the media spin machine is now in full swing, trying to come up with dirt on both Edward Snowden, and the journalist who published the story in the Guardian: Glenn Greenwald. The goal of course, is to slowly make the media shift their focus away from the main story, and onto petty things instead, like the obsession with Snowden’s girlfriend, or whether Greenwald should be charged with a crime or not. The goal of those manipulators behind the scenes is to discredit the source who has been leaking this classified but vitally important information, so that eventually people will start to no longer believe him. By discrediting the whistle blower, they hope to also discredit his story. Don’t they get it? Don’t they get that transparency, and democratic oversight, checks and balances are what any government that claims to be a government of the people, by the people and for the people desperately needs? Precisely those things that it is now sorely lacking. By having informed, intelligent citizens, we increase overall safety and national security. We don’t make our nations any safer by scaring our citizens and beating them into submission. But as of late, the truncheon is used in lieu of conversation more and more…

Meanwhile in Europe…

Here in Europe, we saw politicians finally taking a stand against the NSA PRISM program, but sadly only because it was in their own self-interest to do so. It wasn’t until Snowden released documents proving that the United States had been spying on European diplomats in Washington, New York and Brussels, as was published in Der Spiegel on July 1st, that we finally got some strong language from some European leaders, with François Hollande even threatened to suspend the trade pact talks with the US. This delayed reaction by European politicians seems to send the message to the European citizens that it’s apparently perfectly OK to spy on European citizens (politicians here were awfully quiet when the story broke), as long as the Americans are not spying on our diplomats and politicians. Oh, and if you’ve heard the NSA’s stories about ‘metadata’, and you’re wondering what ‘harmless metadata’ really means, be sure to check out German Green Party Member Malte Spitz’s six months of telephone records mapped on a moving map. It’s quite a humbling experience. 🙂 Update: Since I wrote this article on July 2nd, 2013, things have changed even more dramatically, as long-established diplomatic principles in international law have been grossly violated by denying President Morales’ plane access to French, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese airspace, causing it to have to divert to Vienna when the president was on his way home from a summit in Moscow. Of course, this caused massive anger in Latin America. The real problem we now have in Europe are leaders with rubber knees. We have our brain, and our sovereignty. Let’s start using it.