Tag Archives: integrity

The Panama Papers: Dirty Money or Dirty Media?

Panama PapersOn 3 April 2016, the first few of the so-called Panama Papers were published by mainstream media across the West. The Panama Papers are a collection of allegedly 2.6 TB of data and documents by and related to Mossack Fonseca, a Panamanian law firm providing offshore trust services.

The leak, given by an anonymous whistle-blower to Bastian Obermayer of the German Süddeutsche Zeitung, consists of 11.5 million documents created between the 1970s and late 2015 by Mossack Fonseca. A consortium of journalists, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) subsequently organised the research and review of the documents.

These documents allegedly provide proof of the rich and powerful in the world storing their massive stashes of money in tax havens across the world like the British Virgin Islands (BVI), Guernsey, The Netherlands, etc. This practice is called tax avoidance, and is usually not illegal. It is highly questionable from a moral standpoint though. Billions of euros or dollars flow through thousands of shell companies that provide no benefit to society in terms of services, goods and employment. And the country of residence of the billionaire in question doesn’t receive tax income which could be put to better use to improve society rather than sit on an anonymous bank account on the Cayman Islands.

Media Bias

Putin_mediaOne of the first things that struck me as odd, but that is sadly no longer surprising, was the incredibly one-sided reporting done on this by the media. On 3 April, lots of articles appeared about the Panama Papers, and they strongly implied that President Putin of Russia was mentioned in these documents. Even though Putin was not mentioned in the few actual documents released to this point, the mainstream media strongly implied (by using photographs depicting Putin, for instance), that Putin is personally involved with the arrangements mentioned in the documents by Mossack Fonseca. The BBC Panorama documentary entitled “Tax Havens of the Rich and Powerful Exposed” is also strongly biased in their editing, showing documents on-screen for only a few nanoseconds behind an unclear background. When you stop the video and zoom in you can clearly see that the documents shown are from the British Virgin Islands, while this British overseas territory is not mentioned even once in the documentary itself, while they are droning on about Putin and the Icelandic former Prime Minister Gunnlaugsson.

Why this massive media bias? Why is it necessary to remind us that leaders from countries like Russia, China, Zimbabwe, North Korea, Syria etc. are corrupt? We know that. That is not news. What would be news is to reveal hard evidence that Western billionaires like George Soros are just as corrupt, and worse, that they influence politics and world affairs using their massive stashes of money.

The reason why the bias is so strong is partly due to the methodology used, and partly because of other interests. The Süddeutsche Zeitung gives a detailed explanation on how these documents were searched for interesting titbits. One of the things they did is focus on countries that may be violating UN sanctions, which might explain in part why the bias is on non-Western countries as it is. Also note that these documents only come from one law firm in Panama. If there would be another leak from, say, a law firm on the BVI, then we might find other people involved.

As Craig Murray, former UK Ambassador to Uzbekistan has written, Western journalists, the corporate media gatekeepers, are withholding the vast majority of the actual documents from the public. If we truly want to know what the impact of the Panama Papers is, without spin from the media, we should have access to the actual raw documents. Raw docs or it doesn’t exist, so to speak. If you don’t release 99% of the documents, you’re engaged in 1% journalism by definition. This is why I like the work that WikiLeaks is doing. They work very hard to publish the original source documents responsibly so that we can all learn how the world works from the original and authoritative source material. And then all journalists can read these documents on an equal standing. It’s been a pet-peeve of mine for many years that mainstream media don’t link to their sources like bloggers do. If a story is clearly based on documents like in this case the Panama Papers, just release the source documents together with your explanatory articles. Why is this such a problem?

Or are the journalists who have access to these documents afraid of possible blow-back if they report on the hand that feeds them?

Who is funding this?

Because that is the big elephant in the room. Who could be funding this propaganda extravaganza? Let’s have a look at the ICIJ’s site shall we?

Soros

George Soros at the Festival of Economics 2012, Trento. Photo by Niccolò Caranti.

The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists is based in Washington, D.C, and is a project of the Center for Public Integrity. There, on the funding page, you can read that amongst the big institutional funders are names like the Omidyar Network (Pierre Omidyar, owner of The Intercept and founder of eBay), the Open Society Foundations (George Soros), the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Rockefellers, The Democracy Fund (again: Omidyar), and many others.

The OCCRP (Organized Crime and Corruption USAIDReporting Project) is also heavily involved with the Panama Papers project, and is sponsored, by (again) the Open Society Institute of George Soros, and also USAID, which is a US government agency and front organisation posing as a charity and frequently used as an instrument of regime change.

Is it strange that which such backers the very first news reports that came out were so incredibly biased? Given how much the US administration would like to see regime change in Russia, are these reports bashing the Russian President a surprise? No, sadly, I’m not surprised any more. What I find despicable, is that so many journalists who worked on this, like to think of themselves as independent and the ultimate arbiters of truth, when evidently, they are not.

Why are there not reports about the vast amount of wealth stashed away in tax havens by George Soros? Mark Zuckerberg? Warren Buffet? The journalists sacrificed a token Western leader like Gunnlaugsson from Iceland, so they can claim to be bias-free (“look, we’re also publishing on Western leaders!”), while in reality, their entire enterprise is funded by the rich and powerful in the West. So I think I can quite confidently predict that for instance George Soros’s financial arrangements in various tax havens will not be published. Mark my words.

Country X: The Country That Shall Not Be Named

On Monday, 19 May 2014, Glenn Greenwald published his report entitled Data Pirates of the Caribbean: The NSA is recording every cell call in the Bahamas, in which he reported about the NSA SOMALGET program, which is part of the larger MYSTIC program. MYSTIC has been used to intercept the communications of several countries, namely the Bahamas, Mexico, Kenya, the Phillipines, and thanks to Wikileaks we now know that the final country, redacted in Glenn Greenwalds original report on these programs, was Afghanistan.

MYSTICSOMALGET can be used to take in the entire audio stream (not just metadata) of all the calls in an entire country, and store this information for (at least) 30 days. This is capability the NSA developed, and was published by The Washington Post in March this year.

Why the Censorship?

The question however, is why Glenn Greenwald chose to censor the name of Afghanistan out of his report. He claims it has been done to protect lives, but I honestly can’t for the life of me figure out why lives would be at risk when it is revealed to the Afghani’s that their country is one of the most heavily surveilled on the planet? This information is not exactly a secret. Why is this knowledge that’s OK for the Bahamians to possess, but not the Afghani’s? The US effectively colonized Afghanistan and it seems that everyone with at least half a brain can figure out that calling someone in Afghanistan might have a very high risk of being recorded and analysed by NSA. Now we know for certain that the probability of this happening is 1.

Whistleblowers risk their lives and livelihoods to bring to the public’s attention, information that they deem to be in the gravest public interest. Now, whistleblowers carefully consider which information to publish and/or hand out to journalists, and in the case of intelligence whistleblowers, they are clearly more expert than most journalists when it comes to security and sensing which information has to be kept from the public in the interest of safety of lives and which information can be published in the public interest. After all, they have been doing exactly that for most of their professional lives, in a security-related context.

Now, it seems that Greenwald acts as a sort of filter between the information Edward Snowden gave him for publication, and the actual information the public is getting. Greenwald is sitting on an absolute treasure-trove of information and is clearly cherry picking which information to publish and which information to withhold. By what criteria I wonder? Spreading out the publication of data however, is a good strategy, given that about a year has passed since the first disclosures, and it’s still very much in the media, which is clearly a very good thing. I don’t think that would have happened if all the information was dumped at once.

But on the other hand: Snowden has risked his life and left his comfortable life on Hawaii behind him to make this information public, a very brave thing to do, and certainly not a decision to take lightly, and has personally selected Greenwald to receive this information. And here is a journalist who is openly cherry-picking and censoring the information given to him, already preselected by Snowden, and thereby withholding potentially critical information from the public?

So I would hereby like to ask: By what criteria is Greenwald selecting information for publication? Why the need to interfere with the whistleblower’s judgement regarding the information, who is clearly more expert at assessing the security-related issues surrounding publication?

Annie Machon, whistleblower and former MI5, has also done an interview on RT about this Afghanistan-censoring business of Greenwald, whistleblowers deserve full coverage. Do watch. Whistleblowers risk their lives to keep the public informed of government and corporate wrongdoing. They need our support.

Update: Mensoh has also written a good article (titled: The Deception) about Greenwald’s actions, also in relation to SOMALGET and other releases. A highly recommended read.

Persecution of whistleblowers and journalists

Chelsea ManningI was also honoured to be able to attend the Sam Adams Associates’ award ceremony in Oxford, United Kingdom last month, and Chelsea Manning is a truly worthy recipient of the Sam Adams Award for Integrity in Intelligence. Her leaking of the Collateral Murder video to WikiLeaks (a video showing how U.S. Air Force personnel shoots at several unarmed civilians, 2 Reuters journalists and a father with 2 small children) proved that the U.S. was committing war crimes in Iraq. It was incredibly brave of her to leak the footage to WikiLeaks. For obvious reasons, Manning sadly could not make it to the ceremony herself, so her friend Aaron Kirkhouse received the award and delivered her acceptance speech.

It is absolutely horrific that whistle-blowers are being persecuted (Manning received 35 years in prison) while the real war criminals (the crew who fired from the Apache attack helicopter, killing dozens of unarmed civilians) gets to live in freedom.

And this isn’t happening solely to Manning either, it happened to other whistle-blowers and the people who are brave enough speak truth to power as well. And now we’ve come to the point where journalists are prevented from doing their jobs, and are increasingly approached with hostility by the state. Especially the ones who ask the critical questions that need asking.

Julian Assange is still under what basically amounts to house arrest in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, because the Swedish authorities want to prosecute him. Assange fears that the Swedes will hand him over to the U.S. authorities because of his work for WikiLeaks. I think this is a very real fear, and Assange has offered the Swedish authorities the opportunity to send investigators to the U.K. to question him in person inside the Embassy. They have refused.

Just last week I’ve read the news about how the Dutch authorities have made up lies about the Dutch investigative journalist Brenno de Winter, that he had hacked facilities/infrastructure or committed burglary, etcetera. They then shared his personal information, including his address to government departments and the police. When he was having a lunch meeting the receptionist was startled and said that they had a ‘protocol’ for Mr. De Winter. A security guard was then sent to accompany him and watch his every move as he ate his lunch.

These are all classic cases of the government shooting the messenger, instead of heeding to the message and making serious inroads in making sure that war crimes and crimes against humanity, corruption, and abuse of power are stopped.

Whistle-blowers are incredibly important for society to keep power in government and corporations accountable to the people, to let the people know about what is going on. Journalists, and a free press in general, are likewise very important as well, and the second we lose a free press, that’s the second we’ve lost our freedom. The media are being used by the powers that be to influence public opinion. After all, to quote Juice Rap News: “If it’s not on “the News”, it didn’t happen, right?”

Gave Privacy By Design Talk At eth0

eth0I gave my talk about privacy by design last Saturday at eth0 2014 winter edition, a small hacker get-together which was organised in Lievelde, The Netherlands this year. eth0 organizes conferences that aim at bringing people with different computer-related interests together. They organise two events per year, one during winter. I’ve previously given a very similar talk at the OHM2013 hacker conference which was held in August 2013.

Video

Here’s the footage of my talk:

Quick Synopsis

I talked about privacy by design, and what I did with relation to Annie Machon‘s site and recently, the Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence site. The talk consists of 2 parts, in the first part I explained what we’re up against, and in the second part I explained the 2 sites in a more specific case study.

I talked about the revelations about the NSA, GCHQ and other intelligence agencies, about the revelations in December, which were explained eloquently by Jacob Applebaum at 30C3 in Hamburg in December. Then I moved on to the threats to website visitors, how profiles are being built up and sold, browser fingerprinting. The second part consists of the case studies of both Annie Machon’s website, and the Sam Adams Associates’ website.

I’ve mentioned the Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence, for whom I had the honour to make their website so they could have a more public space where they could share things relating to the Sam Adams Award with the world, and also to provide a nice overview of previous laureates and what their stories are.

Swiss FlagOne of the things both sites have in common is the hosting on a Swiss domain, which provides for a safer haven where content may be hosted safely without fear of being taken down by the U.S. authorities. The U.S. claims jurisdiction on the average .com, .net, .org domains etc. and there have been cases where these have been brought down because it hosted content the U.S. government did not agree with. Case in point: Richard O’Dwyer, a U.K. citizen, was threatened with extradition to the United States for being the man behind TVShacks, which was a website that provided links to copyrighted content. MegaUpload, the file locker company started by Kim Dotcom, was given the same treatment, where if you would visit their domain, you were served an image from the FBI telling you the domain had been seized.

Privacy in danger, but there’s light at end of the tunnel

Note: This article is also available in Portuguese, translated by Anders Bateva.

Last week I read an article about the plan by the National Police of the Netherlands to connect all CCTV cameras to the national camera network which is operated by the police. SurveillanceThe upper echelon of the Dutch police is currently secretly writing their policy document entitled Sensing, in which the definite plans will be written out in further detail. It would be interesting to know the contents of this secret report, since I’m pretty sure all the standard, same old arguments about why this should be implemented will be brought to the table again. They will probably say that it’ll prevent crime and deter hoodlums, etcetera. We’ve read the arguments for it again and again, but fact of the matter is that more cameras doesn’t mean less crime, CCTV cameras have never stopped criminals from committing a crime, they are ineffective, and it’s an invasion to our privacy, especially when it’s all connected into a single, nation-wide network, recording all our movements. It’s the Panopticon! This then gets stored indefinitely, because governments the world over only remember the ‘delete’ command (‘rm -rf’ if you will) when it’s in their interest to delete stuff. All other stuff (like these camera images, but also information stored by our various intelligence agencies, financial information, the sites you visit, your e-mail, call records, medical records, etcetera) never gets deleted. That’s why the NSA is building their new data-bunker in Bluffdale, Utah, to create more storage space so they get to keep storing all kinds of data about our lives that goes over a wire. And our intelligence agencies are all in on it. Dutch Home Office Minister Ronald Plasterk had a bit of a row with parliament, with MPs being angry about a tiny parliamentary technicality, namely that Plasterk lied to them, claiming the NSA collected metadata on 1.8 million phone calls in the Netherlands, while it was in fact our own intelligence service, the AIVD, doing it. The sad thing of our political system is that they put all the focus on this tiny parliamentary technicality, when they totally forget about the big picture, namely that 1.8 million phone calls were being tapped, and that we should do something about this. 1.8 million is an enormous number for a country of 17 million people. Even more scary is that the parliamentary commission which is supposed to provide oversight over the intelligence community, the Commisie van Toezicht op de Inlichtingen- en Veiligheidsdiensten (CTIVD), also known as Commissie Stiekem, had no knowledge about this, and didn’t know that this was even happening. So much for oversight. The problem with oversight over intelligence agencies is that because of the very nature of these agencies they keep their information a secret, and they can lie to our elected representatives with impunity, and there’s no way to check until someone brave enough to blow the whistle steps forward.

This House Would Call Edward Snowden A Hero: 212 yay, 171 nay

Edward SnowdenMeanwhile, at an Oxford Union debate last week in Oxford, United Kingdom, the Union passed a motion to call Edward Snowden a hero by 212 votes against 171. It was a lively debate, both from the members of the proposition and the members of the opposition, and I have to side with the proposition, because without people like Snowden, who has given up his previous comfortable life on Hawaii to blow the whistle, the world would have never known about the crimes of the spies. Eventually there comes a point where you’re asked to forget about it! so many times and about such egregious crimes that you can no longer look at yourself in the mirror any more, and something has to be done, the people need to be informed. During the debate I heard the opposition say that Snowden “violated his oath”. This is an argument that popped up again and again in various articles I’ve read in which people vilified Snowden. In fact, he didn’t swear an oath to secrecy, no-one does. He swore an oath to the Constitution of the United States; to uphold the Constitution. He hasn’t violated the Constitution; the U.S. government and the NSA in particular violated it. Yes spies spy, that’s not surprising, but they claim all is done in the name of national security, when it is in fact often corporate espionage that these intelligence agencies engage in. It’s about making sure the lucrative contract goes to Boeing instead of to Airbus; it has nothing to do with national security, but more with corporate profits. And there’s no meaningful oversight whatsoever: these people lie with impunity. That alone is already endangering our very democracies, having people with absolute power without any form of effective oversight is very detrimental and damaging to our very democracies and free societies. Snowden mentioned that whilst working at Booz Allen Hamilton, he had the power to tap everyone, including the President of the United States. And he wasn’t the only one with that kind of security clearance either. In the United States, almost 5 million people have a security clearance, with more than 1.4 million people having access to TOP SECRET documents. Imagine what kind of information the intelligence community has about the private life of the President and his family, and how a less honest person might use that. It would be easy to blackmail the President into doing the spooks’ bidding! And in the United States, more and more tasks that used to be done by government exclusively (like intelligence), is now being done by companies like Booz Allen Hamilton, or Academi (which I like to call: the company previously known as Blackwater USA). This is a very scary development because these companies have profit as their basic motivation. They do not have our best interests at heart. Lord Acton wrote in 1887:

“Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority, still more when you super-add the tendency or the certainty of corruption by authority. There is no worse heresy than that the office sanctifies the holder of it.”

Chelsea Manning Receives Sam Adams Award 2014

Also at the Oxford Union last week, the Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence awarded Chelsea Manning their award for the year 2014, meant for people who display extraordinary integrity in intelligence. The group and award was named after Sam Adams, a CIA intelligence analyst, who in 1967 discovered that there were far more Communist forces under arms in Vietnam, roughly twice the number U.S. command in Saigon would admit to. This intelligence revealed that the Pentagon was vastly under-reporting the number of enemy forces. But I digress.. Collateral MurderChelsea Manning revealed, by releasing the Collateral Murder video to WikiLeaks, that U.S. forces were committing war crimes. This showed the crew of a U.S. Apache attack helicopter firing away at unarmed civilians, Reuters journalists, and a father who was bringing his children to school and stopped his van to help one of the Reuters journalists who tried to drag himself onto the curb, heavily wounded. The U.S. forces were yelling like it was some sort of snuff video game, it’s absolutely horrific, and these people should be brought to trial and charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity. Because that’s what it is. Chelsea Manning displayed extraordinary courage in releasing these documents, and rightly deserves this award. Meanwhile, I’m looking forward to the day the U.S. government and the crew of the Apache helicopter in question, are indicted for multiple counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity. At which point the United States will invoke the American Service-Members’ Protection Act (also known as the The Hague Invasion Act). But that’s another story.

The Rising Trend of Criminalizing Hackers & Tinkerers

Note: This article is also available in Portuguese, translated by Anders Bateva.

There seems to be a rising trend of criminalizing hackers & tinkerers. More and more, people who explore the limits of the equipment, hardware and software they own and use, whether they tinker with it, re-purpose it, or expand its functionalities, are met with unrelenting persecution by authorities. In the last couple of years, the trend seems to be that these things, or things which humans have done for thousands of years, like sharing, expanding and improving upon culture, are persecuted. An example is the recent possibility of making violations of Terms of Service, Terms of Use and other Terms put forward by service providers a crime under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). The companies that are now (for the most part) in control of our collective culture are limiting the methods of sharing more and more, often through judicial and/or technical means. The technical means for the most part don’t work, thankfully. DRM is still a big failure and never got off the ground, although the content industry is still trying to cling onto it. The judicial means, however, can be very effective at crushing someone, especially in the litigious United States of America. In the U.S., about 95% of all criminal cases end in a plea bargain, because that’s cheaper than trial by jury. These people are forced by financial pressure to enter a plea bargain, even if they didn’t commit the crimes of which they are accused.

Aaron SwartzAaron Swartz

The late Aaron Swartz was persecuted heavily by the U.S. government for downloading millions of scientific articles from JSTOR at MIT, JSTOR being the closed-source library of scientific articles, access to which is commercially exploited by ITHAKA, the entity that runs it. Aaron believed that scientific research paid for by the public, should be available to the public for free. It’s completely logical that research paid for by the public belongs to the public, and not to some company which basically is saying: “Thank you very much, we’ll have that, now we are going to charge for access to the scientific results, and reap the financial benefits.” It is sad that the world lost a great hacker and tinkerer, committing suicide, only 26 years old, unable to bear the pressure brought down upon him any longer, when in the end, according to his lawyer Elliot Peters, he probably would have won the case due to the fact that the U.S. Secret Service failed to get a search warrant for Swartz’s laptop until 34 days after they seized it.

The corporate world is seizing control of content creation

This trend is seen more and more lately. The companies in control of most of our content production, devices and systems don’t want you to tinker with them, not even if you own them. Apple is closing their systems by soon preventing you from installing your own software on OS X. Software installs will soon only be permitted through the Apple-curated App Store. Already there’s software in OS X, called Gatekeeper that’s meant to prevent you from installing apps that might contain malware. If you read between the lines in that previous link you’ll see that it’s only a matter of time before they’re going to tighten the reins, and make Gatekeeper more oppressive. Google is rapidly closing Android, and moving more and more parts of the once open-source system to its own Google Play Services app. Check the permissions on that app; it’s incredibly scary just how much of the system is now locked up in this closed-source binary blob, and how little the actual android system now handles. Recently, text messaging functionality was moved from the Android OS to the Google Hangouts app, so texting with an Android 4.4 (KitKat)-equipped phone is no longer possible without a Google account and being logged into that. Of course, Google will store all your text messages, for easy access by American intelligence and law enforcement agencies. If you now were to install Android, and remove the Google Play Services app, you might be surprised at how much stuff depends on that app nowadays. When you remove Google Play Services, your phone basically becomes a non-functional plastic brick. These companies fail to see that any invention is made by standing on the shoulders of giants and working upon other people’s work, making it better, tinkering and modifying it, using it for other purposes not envisioned by the original author et cetera. This is what makes culture, this is what makes us. We are fundamentally social creatures, we share. The same implementation of control systems happens with e-books as well. The devices used to read them usually aren’t open, like the Amazon Kindle for example, so that is a problem. We humans have been sharing culture for millions of years and sharing books for thousands of years, basically since writing was invented in Mesopotamia. It is as natural to human development as breathing. We are social creatures, and we thrive on feedback from our peers. But there’s something worse going on in e-book land. In the Netherlands, all e-book purchases now have to be stored in a database called Centraal Boekhuis, which details all buyer information, and this central database will be easily accessible by Stichting BREIN, the country’s main anti-piracy & content industry lobby club. This was ostensibly done to prevent e-book piracy, but I would imagine that this database soon will be of interest to intelligence agencies. Think of it: a centralized database containing almost all books and which people read which books. You can learn a lot about a person just from the books they read. Joseph Stalin and Erich Honecker would be proud. We reached a high water mark of society after the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights at the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948, but it’s sad to see that here in the Western world, we’ve been slipping from that high pillar of decency and humanity ever since. To quote V from V for Vendetta:

“Where once you had the freedom to object, to think and speak as you saw fit, we now have censors and systems of surveillance coercing your conformity and soliciting your submission.”

The surveillance is now far worse than what George Orwell could have possibly imagined. We need to remind the spooks and control freaks in governments around the world that Nineteen Eighty-Four is not an instruction manual. It was a warning. And we’ve ignored it so far.

Speaking Truth to Power: Integrity in the Mainstream Media

RT Front page

Yesterday I watched a public discussion (last link in Dutch) on Sargasso between Jeroen Wollaars, NOS reporter, and Arjen Kamphuis, futurist, writer, and co-founder and CTO at Gendo. During his talk at OHM2013 (titled: Futureshock), someone asked Arjen a question that went somewhat like this: “If we cannot trust the mainstream media anymore to supply us with the information we need to act as informed citizens, what is the alternative?” To which Arjen replied that, if you want to be better informed about what happens in the Western world, RT (Russia Today) is pretty good.

Now it is important to be very nuanced here. You probably shouldn’t believe the RT reporting done on stuff that is happening in Russia, as RT is, just like any media organization, selective in the information they broadcast, and probably won’t be objective when it comes to Russia, just like the Western media aren’t objective on Western subjects. But on Western issues, and informing us about all the stuff the Western governments are doing, the RT reporting is very good because unlike the Western mainstream media, the Russians dare to ask the questions that need to be asked. Questions that you won’t hear from the Western mainstream media, and the Dutch media in particular.

So many questions..Collateral Murder

Why are the people who committed war crimes and crimes against humanity in an attack helicopter during the Iraq War under the Bush Administration still allowed to walk free, whereas Chelsea Manning was sentenced to 35 years for simply exposing those very same war crimes? How come Manning was sentenced to 35 years, while Anders Breivik was sentenced to just 21? Isn’t that a bit off? A man who ruthlessly and pointlessly murdered 77 people gets less years in prison than someone who exposed the dirty laundry of the powers that be?

When exactly did Dutch Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende know about the contents of the Downing Street Memos? Remember, these were the memos that proved definitively that “facts were being fixed around the policy” and that Governor Bush was set in his ways on provoking a war with Saddam Hussein’s Iraq. His administration claimed that Saddam had WMDs (which was a blatant lie, even then), and they even tried to connect Saddam to Al-Qaeda.

AIVDWhere is the coverage about our own intelligence agencies, like the AIVD, MIVD etc. in relation to the revelations on PRISM? Do they have the same capabilities, do they request data on Dutch citizens from their UK and US partners? What kind of data sharing is done with these inter-agency cooperations? We know the Americans spy on Dutch citizens as well (just like they do on every person on the planet connected to the Internet or phone networks), but where are the critical questions from the media? Where are the tough talk shows and debates that really question a few high-ranking politicians about these very important issues? The Germans have at least asked these questions to their politicians.

What is the underlying reason for the massive nation-wide push for the RFID OV-chipkaart public transport ticket (at the expense of normal paper tickets), the ANPR (automatic number plate recognition) cameras above the nation’s highways (which are also used by police), or the fingerprints on the RFID chip on our passports? The government seems intent on tracking our every move.

And these are just a handful of questions the Dutch media didn’t bother to ask and issues they didn’t bother to cover.

The problem with the Dutch mainstream media

The Dutch mainstream media are unfortunately excruciatingly bad at journalism. For instance, the whole Manning case is barely on the news here, but whenever the American presidential elections draw near, the whole Dutch mainstream media press corps gets their knickers in a twist in trying to report on the American ‘elections’ in excruciating and nitty-gritty detail.

There are more important things going on in the world than reporting on an election that is principally undemocratic to begin with. After the 2000 presidential election, Governor Bush squatted the White House for 8 years, while Al Gore won the popular vote. It sure was convenient that Bush’s brother Jeb happened to be Governor of Florida when the electoral votes for that state were the deciding factor in who would win the presidency. And there’s stuff like voter suppression and gerrymandering going on in the US as well, which can influence elections quite substantially. But this fixation the Dutch media has with the US elections has always surprised me, given the fact that the coverage is almost on par with our own elections!

The Dutch media stopped asking the critical questions, and are now almost exclusively broadcasting propaganda from Washington. No questions asked, no background stories, no critical analyses, no audi alteram partem. They now mostly copy-paste the press releases from PR departments, and I really miss the critical tone. Most articles are less than 3 paragraphs long.

I will gladly watch the NOS and other Dutch media again (online, for free, not behind a paywall, and using open standards to provide streaming video) when they start being critical of the government which decides on their budget, and start speaking truth to power.

And this is the main reason why I use RT (among others) to keep me updated on the stuff our Western governments are doing. Unlike the Western mainstream media, RT is asking the questions, they currently speak truth to (Western) power. And again, nuance is important: you shouldn’t believe RT too much when it comes to Russia, just like you shouldn’t believe the Western media too much when it comes to the West. It’s both propaganda, one way or the other. The Russians are at least open and frank about where RT gets their money from; in the West they are much more indirect and subtle about these matters. It’s always best to get your news from as many sources as possible, and make your own decisions on who is more likely to tell you the truth.